Wildlife Cameraman Blog

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The Spirit of the Kite

The Spirit of the Kite is first novel in ‘The Life and Times of Tudor Morgan‘ series.

For some time I have wanted to write a novel that captured the essence of being a wildlife cameraman within the genre of murder mystery. In addition I wanted nature conservation to be key to the storyline. In The Spirit of the Kite I hope I’ve achieved that without sacrificing a good page turning yarn. In addition I wanted humour and a feelgood factor. You will have to judge for yourselves.

Last year I met Ian Rankin, my favourite author, in Chepstow Bookshop. I mentioned that I was writing a novel based around a wildlife cameraman and he was very encouraging. The result, novel two, featuring Tudor Morgan, is well on the way. I haven’t decided on a name for that one yet but it will be The Spirit of the … and will feature hen harrier persecution amongst other crimes.

The Spirit of the Kite – outline: black coffee again: no milk in the fridge, but plenty of adder venom – useful one day perhaps. After a tragic end to his career as a special forces sniper, Tudor Morgan has settled into his new life as a wildlife cameraman. He’s been commissioned to film a BBC documentary about the near extinct red kite in the mountainous heart of rural Wales. Preparation is going well until close friends ask for help with the burial of a loved one under the kite nesting tree. Why not – he owns a shovel. But someone witnesses the clandestine burial, an intruder contracted to steal the kites’ eggs. Fate has dangled a juicy bait – the interloper is Gavin Grey, so-called comrade, the scumbag that murdered Tudor’s lover on the mission that ended his military career. With the community, the kites, the documentary and his own life on the line, Tudor concludes that imaginative and devastating revenge is the most attractive option.

Tudor Morgan – the character: bypassing the local police, Tudor metes out his own brand of justice. He allies his military training with the cynicism of John Rebus, but he’s more Jack Frost than Jack Reacher. He’s a likeable, unlikely hero, a true champion of the countryside.