The Rabbit

This is a cinema short produced on the Isle of Man for Mann Films. The story is based on the old joke about a neighbour whose pet rabbit is being harassed by the dog next door, but some clever scripting takes it up a level.

The Rabbit

Last Licks

This short film was produced for an organisation called 'Dad Talk' and looks at the issues surrounding absent fathers and knife crime. The writer and director is Colin Skevington. The whole movie was filmed hand held if I remember rightly.

Last Licks

Lonesome Busker

Filmed on location in Newport, South Wales and in a green screen studio. I have filmed many music videos like this one, and as yet there has been no wildlife at all in any of them.

Lonesome Busker

Pigeon Post

Produced for festivals, this charming period drama is directed by Stewart Mackay and stars Derek Fowlds and a number of other well known actors. I was DoP on this one, and particularly enjoyed lighting the interiors.

Pigeon Post

The Gatekeeper

Filming 'The Gatekeeper' was a riot. The director is Darren Ripley. I am very proud to have a Welsh Zombie Movie on my CV!

The Gatekeeper

Other Types of Filming

Here are a few clips from non-wildlife productions. I hope you enjoy them. There are many other examples that I'd like to put here, particularly sport, but I just can't source them.

It's nice to call yourself a wildlife cameraman, but that doesn't necessarily mean that that is all you film. Just the other day I was asked for advice about getting into the business, and made a comment that in hindsight was too flippant, and it was 'get on with people'. I stand by that to an extent, but a better answer would be, 'practice... all types of filming with any kit you can get your hands on. Then practice most at your particular area of interest as a cameraman specialising in wildlife.' But there are lots of other answers to this question and many of them have nothing to do with the challenges of actually filming wildlife.

Watching the 'making of' sections at the end of wildlife programmes will help you realise that a high percentage of a wildlife cameraman's job is travel, preparation, waiting and failure before you eventually, hopefully, get the shots.